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5 New Year's Resolutions Every Online Marketer Should Make

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6 new years resolutions every online marketer should make
Image credit: North Shore-LIJ on Flickr

 

Whew! Another year has come and gone, and 2011 is almost out the door. But before you rush into 2012, it's best to list down a few resolutions to ensure that you get started with the New Year on the right foot.

Not quite sure where to start? These 5 New Year’s resolutions for Internet Marketing should give you some ideas:

1. Tweet more (meaningful things) – If there's one action that's guaranteed to give you more success in Twitter it's this: Tweet more about things that people care about. With over 100 million active users, the only way to stand out is to post tidbits that resonate with your target audience. Do this often, and your Twitter account is bound to come up in people's radars in no time.

2. Don't be a snooty social media marketer – You know that you're a snooty social media marketer when: a) You don't respond to people just because they only have followers in the double digits; b) You only follow and "like" big name brands on Twitter and Facebook; or c) You don't respond to messages on LinkedIn just because the user that reached out has less than 100 connections. If you're guilty of any of the above, then resolve to have a more open and SOCIAL attitude this coming new year. Interact and promote smaller, less-famous brands and you'll soon see an increase in your engagement rates. More often than not, it's the minor guys that are the most eager to respond and collaborate with your efforts, and while they may not be the coolest kids on the block, they usually have a small but loyal group of fans and followers. And you never know; that obscure little company could end up toppling Google in the future. Wouldn't you want to be on their good side when they hit it big?

3. Don't be a selfish Internet marketer – Here's an idea: In 2012, be the kind of person who gives free advice and promotes others just because. Provide tips to those that ask, or write a blog post about other companies (and tag/tweet them while you're at it). Don't expect anything in return, and don't help people because they're paying you. When done right, these little acts of kindness could turn people into followers, brand advocates, and maybe even paying customers.

4. Know your Klout and Kred scores, but don't let them rule your social media agenda – First things first. Klout is a score ranging from 1-100 that supposedly indicates how influential you are on the social web. It is calculated by factoring in "what proportion of the content you create is acted upon and how influential the people are performing the actions." It's important to note that Klout isn't perfect, and it's definitely not a universally accepted influence metric. However, that doesn't mean that you should disregard your Klout score completely. After all, it's still a way to see how influential you are to your network (at least from one point of view), and as Klout CEO Joe Fernandez put it, "At the most basic level it is a helpful way to evaluate your effectiveness on social media compared to everyone else."

Kred, on the other hand gives a dual score and measures both your Influence and Outreach Level. The former is determined by the number of people that retweet, follow, and reply to you, while the latter is scored by how often you initiate interactions on Twitter. It’s based on the same concept of Klout, but Kred is more transparent in its scoring methods. You earn Influence Points every time others retweet or reply to your posts and the number of points that you receive will vary depending on the follower count of the people who interacted with you (i.e. 10 points are earned if you are retweeted or replied to by a user with less than 10,000 followers, but you’ll earn 25 points if you get a retweet or reply by someone with more than 10,000 followers). The exact details of how Kred calculates your scores can be found in its website.

Kred was only launched a few weeks ago, and like Klout, it’s not an exact science, and it is yet to be regarded as a credible and universal way to measure social influence.

The bottom line is, while you may want to consider your (and other people’s) Klout and Kred scores in your social media activities, these numbers shouldn’t be the determining factors of your actions. In the same the way that you shouldn’t compromise content for search engine keywords, you shouldn’t prioritize social media interactions for Klout and Kred scores.

5. Read more – If you can’t read, then you can’t write. And if you can’t write, then you’re going to have a tough time in the Internet marketing industry. Knowing what’s happening in the world is essential to producing content that people actually want to read. In order to always stay in the loop, subscribe to relevant blogs and publications; enter their RSS feeds into your Google Reader so that you can conveniently access latest posts. Need to find more sites related to your industry? Browse through the numerous categories at Alltop.com—a site that serves as an online magazine news stand that brings the best blogs to the forefront.

Do you have any New Year’s resolutions in 2012? What Internet marketing habits are you going to develop (or get rid of) in the coming year? Share your thoughts in the comments below!

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About the author
Francesca Nicasio
Francesca Nicasio
Francesca is the founder of Credible Copywriting and has written for several organizations, including Internet start-ups, advertising agencies, and small businesses, just to name a few. She has helped individuals and entities put their names and messages out there by producing quality works in the form of articles, web content, video scripts, and more. Touch base with her at: francesca@crediblecopywriting.net or visit her website at: http://crediblecopywriting.net. - Read more stories from .